Tag Archives: Jazz Education

The Continuum of Jazz: Article/Profile of Ellis Marsalis, Harold Battiste, and Irvin Mayfield, Jr.

This week my cover story for local entertainment publication Where Y’at magazine’s  New Orleans Jazz Fest issue: Interview/profile of legendary jazz musicians/educators Ellis Marsalis, Harold Battiste, and Irvin Mayfield.

Read “The Continuum of Jazz” from Where Y’at magazine

Thanks again to Laura Tennyson, Communications Strategist for the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra for arranging this interview and to Josh Danzig and the staff at Where Y’at magazine for the assignment. Photo credits: Romney Photography

(From left to right: Ed Petersen (standing – recent performance paying tribute to the music of Harold Battiste), Harold Battiste, Irvin Mayfield, Jr., Victor Atkins (standing – recent performance paying tribute to the music of Ellis Marsalis, Jr.), and Ellis Marsalis, Jr.

My profile of Irvin Mayfield, A Golden Trumpet and a Midas Touch (2010)
My profile of Ellis Marsalis Encouragement, Support, & Exposure: The Lessons of Ellis Marsalis, Jr. (2007)

Ellis Marsalis, Harold Battiste, and Irvin Mayfield: Interview/Article Preview

If those of you living outside of New Orleans want to know why natives like me love it here, one reason is the plethora of and accessibility to great artists. The artistic ability per square mile in this city is astounding. I wrote an article that will appear in local entertainment publication Where Y’at magazine during New Orleans Jazz Fest in late April/Early May, and had a chance to interview legendary jazz musicians/educators Ellis Marsalis, Harold Battiste, and Irvin Mayfield.

I never get tired of speaking to great musicians and artists, particularly about the creative process and the courageous nature of developing your artistic gift in the face of daunting challenges. Here’s an excerpt from my interview – a quote from Irvin Mayfield, Artistic Director of the GRAMMY Award-winning New Orleans Jazz Orchestra and of the New Orleans Jazz Institute at the University of New Orleans, regarding his esteemed predecessors in jazz and music education:

“Nobody starts to play basketball because they had a great coach. They play basketball because they saw Michael Jordan. As much as I have respect for all of the classroom time that these gentlemen (Marsalis and Battiste) have spent, I would never have been interested in them if they couldn’t play. We call these guys educators, but was Louis Armstrong any less of an educator? Was Cannonball Adderley any less of an educator? Was Miles Davis?”

– Irvin Mayfield

(Pictured left to right, Myself, Irvin Mayfield, and Ellis Marsalis)

My profile of Irvin Mayfield, A Golden Trumpet and a Midas Touch (2010)
My profile of Ellis Marsalis Encouragement, Support, & Exposure: The Lessons of Ellis Marsalis, Jr. (2007)

Thanks to Laura Tennyson, Communications Strategist for the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra for arranging this interview and to Josh Danzig and the staff at Where Y’at magazine for the assignment.

Resources and Links for Jazz Artists and PR Personnel, Fans, Students, and Educators

Here are a couple of promotional resources for Jazz artists, followed by a lengthy list of general jazz resources for jazz musicians, students, educators, and aficionados.
Most fans of internet streaming audio are familiar with Pandora. Accujazz.com is an internet jazz radio site that allows you to segregate by instrument, styles, eras, etc. The site claims 400,000 unique listeners per month.

If you are an artist (or represent a record label) and you’d like them to play your music on the site, here is the contact information for AccuJazz:
Lucas Gillan
Brand Director
lucas@accuradio.com

Or you can mail your CDs and promotional material to:
AccuJazz.com
c/o AccuRadio
400 N. Wells St., Suite 408
Chicago, IL 60654
Phone: 1-312-527-3879

AllAboutJazz.com is a leading website for jazz articles, CD reviews, profiles, events calendars, etc. Musicians can create profiles, events calendars, and post videos to the site. This site is one of the most popular jazz sites on the web, with over 800,000 unique visitors per month.

Here’s the link to the musician profile start page at AAJ

You might even find a few articles there contributed by a certain music education advocacy author and blogger

MENC: The National Association for Music Education is the leading arts education organizations, working to ensure that every student has access to a well-balanced, comprehensive, and high-quality program of music instruction taught by qualified teachers. MENC has a jazz education website with a number of links

Jamey Aebersold Jazz. Educational products and links.

Jazz improvisation resources Univ. of Wisconsin.

The National Jazz Museum in Harlem. Numerous online resources.

The Stan Getz Library at the Berklee College of Music.

Jazz Corner. News, resources, forums.

JazzBeat.org. Links and resources.

Jazz.com. Articles, reviews, more.

Rifftides. “Doug Ramsey on jazz and other matters.” A blog.

RedHotJazz.com. Essays on jazz before 1930.

Jazz Review online magazine. Reviews and news.

And finally, credit and thanks to MusiciansWay.com for the heads up on a number of these sites. The website is the companion site to the book The Musician’s Way: A Guide to Practice, Performance, and Wellness by Gerald Klickstein, published by Oxford University Press.



J.B. Dyas of The Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz on Maximizing Jazz in the Classroom

J.B. Dyas, V.P. of Education & Curriculum Development for the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz gave a lecture at Loyola University a couple of years ago regarding jazz in the classroom. Interesting that we underestimate the importance of jazz in history/social studies classes as a uniquely American art form.

This is a great lecture for any students, in music-oriented classes or otherwise. Also, this website, ArtistsHouseMusic.org is a great music education resource that was created under the direction of John Snyder of Loyola’s Music Industry Studies program with a grant from Herb Alpert. They do a great job of capturing significant events on video to share.

Link to video