Tag Archives: AllAboutJazz.com

Resources and Links for Jazz Artists and PR Personnel, Fans, Students, and Educators

Here are a couple of promotional resources for Jazz artists, followed by a lengthy list of general jazz resources for jazz musicians, students, educators, and aficionados.
Most fans of internet streaming audio are familiar with Pandora. Accujazz.com is an internet jazz radio site that allows you to segregate by instrument, styles, eras, etc. The site claims 400,000 unique listeners per month.

If you are an artist (or represent a record label) and you’d like them to play your music on the site, here is the contact information for AccuJazz:
Lucas Gillan
Brand Director
lucas@accuradio.com

Or you can mail your CDs and promotional material to:
AccuJazz.com
c/o AccuRadio
400 N. Wells St., Suite 408
Chicago, IL 60654
Phone: 1-312-527-3879

AllAboutJazz.com is a leading website for jazz articles, CD reviews, profiles, events calendars, etc. Musicians can create profiles, events calendars, and post videos to the site. This site is one of the most popular jazz sites on the web, with over 800,000 unique visitors per month.

Here’s the link to the musician profile start page at AAJ

You might even find a few articles there contributed by a certain music education advocacy author and blogger

MENC: The National Association for Music Education is the leading arts education organizations, working to ensure that every student has access to a well-balanced, comprehensive, and high-quality program of music instruction taught by qualified teachers. MENC has a jazz education website with a number of links

Jamey Aebersold Jazz. Educational products and links.

Jazz improvisation resources Univ. of Wisconsin.

The National Jazz Museum in Harlem. Numerous online resources.

The Stan Getz Library at the Berklee College of Music.

Jazz Corner. News, resources, forums.

JazzBeat.org. Links and resources.

Jazz.com. Articles, reviews, more.

Rifftides. “Doug Ramsey on jazz and other matters.” A blog.

RedHotJazz.com. Essays on jazz before 1930.

Jazz Review online magazine. Reviews and news.

And finally, credit and thanks to MusiciansWay.com for the heads up on a number of these sites. The website is the companion site to the book The Musician’s Way: A Guide to Practice, Performance, and Wellness by Gerald Klickstein, published by Oxford University Press.



Ellis Marsalis: “Finding Your Musical Inspiration”

When I interviewed Ellis Marsalis, Jr., the patriarch of the great Marsalis family of jazz, he recalled vividly the music that spoke to him and inspired him to hone his skills as a musician:

“When I was really developing as a piano player, I had one recording that I would play periodically. It was Stratford-Upon-Avon with the Oscar Peterson Trio (Oscar Peterson Live at the Stratford Shakespearean Festival). Once I put that on it would let me know immediately where I was. But you see I found that. And everybody who’s serious, they find it. And it’s different for everybody.”

For me and thousands of jazz guitarists, it was Joe Pass. There was none smoother and more melodic in his artistry. Here’s the link to my tribute to Joe Pass at AllAboutJazz.com And here’s Joe in action

Music Teacher Advice from a Student: Get in the Trenches

I interviewed jazz guitar instructor Hank Mackie a few years ago. Hank’s reputation as both a player and instructor in the New Orleans area is impeccable, spawning a couple of generations of jazz guitar phenoms. I also interviewed a few of his most accomplished students who became professional musicians. Here’s a quote regarding the essence of Hank’s approach to instruction from a student that provides some insight into why he’s so beloved and admired:

“If I could sum it up with one sentence, he got in the trenches with the student,” student Ted Ludwig said, noting the propensity of some teachers to demonstrate a condescending attitude toward students. “He didn’t sit up there on a higher level, look down at you and say OK, this is the thing you need to learn to get up here. He came down to your level and he brought you up. A lot of teachers shoot things at you—If you get it, you get it, if you don’t, you don’t,” he added.

“Hank never was afraid to tell you things more than one time,” says Ludwig. “When Hank was teaching, he let go of the fact that he was a great player. Hank always encouraged his better students to come out and sit in wherever he was playing,” he added, offering further evidence of Mackie’s self-assuredness and humility.

Link to the entire article “Hank Mackie: ‘Pass’-ing Jazz Guitar to a New Generation” at AllAboutJazz.com